Busy, busy, busy, it’s what everyone is these days. We cherish the moments of true relaxation. Work, work, work, it’s what everyone does now-a-days. We adore the moments where we do not have anything that requires our immediate attention.

Some tasks seem futile, no point, no reason to them, and yet we still feel compelled to complete them. Why? Why do we do these tasks even though we have no desire to, or want to? Why? Is it because we have been told we need to? Because we are afraid to disappoint? Because we are unable to break from the cycle? Why? Why do we do it even when we lose sleep over it? When we are losing our minds trying to keep everything straight? When we are being crushed from the weight of it all? Or is it simply because we feel as though we need to do everything thrown at us?

Granted, a generous amount of tasks are helpful, useful, aid in one way or another, but the sheer volume of tasks can be daunting; that, is the biggest, most imperative, problem.

Max, a little succulent in a shoe, relaxing among moss, made me envious. Max, a succulent that gets to perform photosynthesis, made me feel envious because all it does is just that, photosynthesis. A succulent, made me envious because I want to relax, chill, do next to nothing, just as it does. 

One thing after another is thrown at us, whether you are a student, you are a professional, or you are retired; no matter what stage of life you are in, life will keep shoving things at you. Whether you are a student, you are a professional, or you are retired, it can have a big impact on you. Whether its a positive or negative impact differs from person to person, but there is an impact, and effect, nonetheless. 

Max, a succulent adorned with white little spots, does what we all want: nothing. In the grand scheme of things, it does nothing, and in the grand scheme of things most of what we do is futile; however, they feel the polar opposite. They feel like they are the most imperative tasks of all.

Max, you adorable little succulent, I envy you. I also am grateful and lucky to not be you though, because I get to experience, to live, to love, to laugh, to smile, to cry, to jump, to run. I, unlike you, Max, get to be human. A busy human, yes, but human nonetheless.

2 thoughts on “Organic Object Observation

  1. I used an anaphora in the first paragraph to emphasize the fact that people are always busy and always working, so that the reader would understand just how busy people are. Moreover, in the second paragraph I continuously repeated the word why. I did this in order to highlight the fact that even I am still pondering and trying to figure out what I am asking. I also used words such as “futile”, “crushed”, “lose/losing”, and “afraid” to give a tone of hopelessness, and tiredness to further emphasize the busy factor from the previous paragraph. Continuously, I repeated the word “nothing” throughout the entire piece in order to tie everything together, but to also pull it all into the tone of hopelessness.

  2. Max is amazing! I loved seeing him from the perspective of us tall, busy humans. He’s doing something positive and what he’s made to do. I do wonder how much of what we do is likewise part of our callings. Here’s my favorite line: “Max, a little succulent in a shoe, relaxing among moss, made me envious. Max, a succulent that gets to perform photosynthesis, made me feel envious because all it does is just that, photosynthesis.” The sentence structure of the first sentence — a periodical sentence in contrast to what has come before — provides the perfect mini-drama for introducing Max.

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