Organic Object

What is a Yautia Malanga you may ask. Well to be quite honest with you, I am not sure. I have been writing about this strange object for over a week now and I have yet to understand what it is. The name leads one to believe that it is an exotic fruit or vegetable, in which you would be correct. Well, at least the label that the Wegmans produce department placed on it says so. Despite this, the name can be deceiving. You would expect an interesting shape or colorful exterior, but the yautia has neither of those qualities. Its outer layer resembles that of a potato, brown and porous. It is odorless, managing to conceal what is behind the boring and bland outside. As a result, I am left wondering if this strange-looking object is simply a foreign potato or if it is hiding away an exotic flavor or vibrant colored flesh? 

 

Nevertheless, having only had the opportunity to focus on the outside of the vegetable, there left much to be debated about. Was the interior solid? Was it porous? Was it colorful? These things still remain a mystery. Even so, the exterior was exhibiting obvious signs of deterioration. As time passed, the yautia began slowly wearing itself away. Wispy, white spots intertwined with shades of green materialized on the surface of the vegetable. The boring, brown surface was now not so boring. The white and green mixed in with the brown creating pockets of color. This color was of course a result of the vegetable going rancid, but at least it brought something interesting to the table, something other than the perpetual blandless and monotony.

 

 

 

4 thoughts on “Organic Object

  1. After reading A06 and A07, I did not want to have repetition take over my piece, so I was very particular on what words I chose to use more than once. I used the word yautia over and over throughout the writing to familiarize the reader with the strange, exotic word. I also continued to use the word vegetable in different places to create the connection that a yautia is a sort of vegetable. I attempted to make both visual and verbal connections that would allow the reader to see what I was seeing.

    Another tool that I used in my writing was formal diction. My organic object was very boring and at times hard to write about, but the use of formal diction allowed a break from the blandness.

  2. After reading your piece, I was left pondering the transformation your unique organic object underwent and how you viewed this change. The fact that you believed the fruits slow decomposition as a change into something more interesting and colorful seemed like a unique perspective.

    When you wrote “The boring, brown surface was now not so boring. The white and green mixed in with the brown creating pockets of color” I actually went back and reread a portion of the piece again. This double take made me compare the yautia to a person who may be going through a change in their life. While the change may appear to be ugly at first, it will eventually begin to show its purpose and underlying beauty.

  3. It’s funny that I picked out the same line as Spencer: “The boring, brown surface was now not so boring. The white and green mixed in with the brown creating pockets of color. This color was of course a result of the vegetable going rancid, but at least it brought something interesting to the table . . .” I like the double meaning of “table,” polishing off some lovely (if “rancid”) description. It’s ironic that death, in a way, brought this bizarre vegetable to life.

  4. The description of this piece of produce is excellent. I thoroughly enjoyed the first paragraph how you questioned if the yautia malanga “is simply a foreign potato or if it is hiding away an exotic flavor or vibrant colored flesh?” The questions you asked were very intriguing and made me even wonder what inside of the boring-exteriored object looks like.

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