Folding phones may be the future of computing. The ability to have a bigger screen in a smaller footprint is something users are looking for. One of the first folding phones is the Samsung Galaxy Fold. The Galaxy Fold was first seen in November of 2018 as a part of a showcase of Samsung’s “Infinity Flex Displays”. We didn’t get a name or a price, all we got was a showcase of the display tech. Then Samsung went silent for a while and didn’t really give much information. This was  until Samsung’s February 2019 Unpacked event where we saw the Galaxy S10, S10e, S10+ and the Galaxy Fold. This was where we learned a name, a release date of April 26th and a starting price of $1980. This was jaw dropping, as it was more expensive then most other flagship phones. People wanted to see this phone and Samsung knew that. So at the beginning of April they started giving out Galaxy Fold sample units to influencers to get people excited about folding phones. However, they did this without an embargo, a very interesting choice for Samsung. This means that the second the reviewers got the phone, they could post anything about their Galaxy Fold at any time. This was great for Samsung, as they got a ton of people really excited for folding phones, until the problems started. People started reporting issues with their Galaxy Folds. There were two main issues caused by the same problem. The screen protector that Samsung included is the root of both. The film that is included seems very similar to the film found on other new phones for protection and for shipping, but its not. The film is a required film to protect Samsung’s Infinity Flex Display. The big problem with this is that Samsung didn’t include any message on the film in the sample units given to influencers. This made many people believe that it was a screen protector.  Marques Brownlee also known as MKBHD on YouTube (youtu.be/MKBHD) and Mark Gurman of Bloomberg (www.bloomberg.com/authors/AS7Hj1mBMGM/mark-gurman) thought it was a screen protector and removed it, causing both of their phones to fail, but they weren’t the only ones. Dieter Bohn of The Verge (www.theverge.com/authors/dieter-bohn) and Steve Kovach of CNBC (twitter.com/stevekovach) both had screen failures without removing the protective layer. This means that you could potentially destroy your almost $2000 phone with a small piece of dust. This is a big problem and has actually caused Samsung to delay the Galaxy Fold and it will now not be released on April 26th. Samsung’s glimpse of the future has not worked out they way they hoped.

Galaxy Fold: Innovation at the Cost of Reliability

2 thoughts on “Galaxy Fold: Innovation at the Cost of Reliability

  • May 2, 2019 at 1:37 pm
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    they rushed it too fast to be the first

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  • May 2, 2019 at 6:54 pm
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    I like the idea, but I personally wouldn’t get this just because I have no need for it

    Reply

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